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Monthly Archives: November 2014

Holiday Safety for Pets

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The holidays are upon us and with them come the hustle and bustle of visitors, lots of tempting treats and potential overindulgences, but did you know that there are also many hazards for your pets?

STRESS
Holiday stress doesn’t just affect humans – your pets may also feel stressed out by the increased activity and visitors. Make sure they have access to a quiet spot where they can go hide out (you may want to reserve a spot there, too).

DECORATIONS
Holiday ornaments – they’re bright, shiny and to cats and dogs, they may look like toys. Keep decorations out of reach of little hands and paws.

Tinsel & Ribbon – these are almost irresistible, and a huge hazard if they’re ingested. Avoid the vet bill and keep these off the décor list.

Electrical cords – with extra lights come extra cords, and some animals just can’t resist chewing them. Keep them safely tucked away or taped down.

Christmas trees – cats may see a Christmas tree as a wonderful playground you’ve installed just for them so keep ornaments off the lower branches and discourage climbing. Make sure the tree is secure and not easily overturned. If you have a live tree, watch that your animals don’t try to drink water from the tree stand.

PLANTS
Contrary to popular belief poinsettas are only mildly toxic; however lilies, holly and mistletoe are deadly, especially for cats.

THE NO-NO LIST
Alcohol – watch that Fluffy and Fido don’t get stuck into the punchbowl or eggnog. Leeks, onions, sage and other herbs, gravy, turkey skin, cooked bones, grapes, raisins and currants are all very bad for animals. Rich baked goods and chocolates (especially those made with artificial sweeteners like xylitol) are also hazards. Keep these stored in tins whenever possible or covered if they’re kept out on display.

YES IN SMALL AMOUNTS
We always recommend an appropriate diet for your pet, as advised by your veterinarian. However, we know that temptation (and unattended plates) happen during the holiday season!  So, here are some general notes:  Mashed pumpkin is a wonderful, nutritious treat but make sure it’s real pumpkin and not pie filling. Yams are also excellent. Green beans – say yes to fresh, but leave the casserole for humans. Mashed potatoes are fine to share, but make sure they’re plain, with no butter or gravy. Small servings of turkey are fine, but opt for white meat over dark and no skin or bones please.

Keep these numbers handy and Happy holidays!

Pet Poison Helpline 800-213-6680
ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center 888-426-4435

Dogs’ Day at Desert Botanical Garden


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Think gardens are just for caterpillars, butterflies and people to enjoy? Well think again! This Sunday, the Desert Botanical Garden is literally going to the dogs! Bring your family and favorite canine friend and enjoy some time in the beautiful desert greenery. Take a walk in the Garden, view some very special art, or sample some tasty treats for both you and your dog. There will be presentations on “everything dog” and even a craft activity for children.

What dog doesn’t love to be outdoors and “sniff” the plants? Come to the Desert Botanical Garden and make a very special memory with your best doggie friend . . . or friends!

Date: Sunday, November 16th

Time: 8:00 am to 2:00 pm

Where: Desert Botanical Garden – 1201 N. Galvin Parkway, Phoenix, AZ 85008

Admission: For more details and information on dog behavior and entry/admission fees into the Garden visit:
Desert Botanical Gardens – Dogs’ Day

National Animal Shelter & Rescue Appreciation Week!

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6 to 8 million. That is the estimated number of homeless animals each year that need shelter. The number is overwhelmingly staggering, and frankly, heartbreaking. Heather Bialy, director of shelter services for the Human Society of the United States put it this way: “Animal shelters and rescues are making great strides towards finding homes for as many animals as possible, but they can’t do it alone. Shelters and rescues need the support of their communities to cope with the sheer number of animals that need homes, and to respond to emergencies… By working together, communities can put programs into place to address pet homelessness and keep pets with their families.”

There are approximately 3,500 animal shelters across the United States, who provide services the millions of cats, dogs, and other companion animals that end up in the care of rescues or shelters for a myriad of reasons – from family relocations, to allergies, and so on. Some of the most wonderful pets come from shelters and rescues, providing unconditional love and companionship to their human counterparts.

National Animal Shelter and Rescue Appreciation Week is celebrated each year during the first full week of November. Founded in 1996, the Human Society of the United States established the event as a way to get communities involved with their local rescue organizations and shelters.

Get Involved
The Human Society of the United States recommends the following as a few ways everyone can get involved with their local rescue or shelter and help save homeless pets:

• Adopt a pet. Find your next pet online at theshelterpetproject.org and become a fan of the Shelter Pet Project on Facebook at facebook.com/shelterpetproject.

• Encourage your friends, relatives and neighbors to choose to adopt a pet from a shelter or rescue and save a life.

• Share our Facebook icon and show your friends you support shelter adoption and rescue. Better yet, share with your friends a shelter animal’s picture and help find a him or her a home.

• Write a letter to the editor letting readers know about the benefits of adopting and the support shelters and rescues in your community need to increase life-saving.

• Volunteer. Helping animals at a shelter or rescue organization can be a rewarding experience. Look on local groups’ websites for opportunities or visit VolunteerMatch.org. Young people can visit humanesociety.org/youthvolunteer for tips on helping local shelters or rescues.

• Donate funds or supplies. Shelters and rescues are often in need of towels, toys, and other supplies for animals – and collect needed items from family, friends, and colleagues.

We encourage everyone to visit humanesociety.org/sheltersrock and join their Facebook event on November 5th to show others you support shelters and rescues!