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Monthly Archives: November 2018

Why You Should Consider Adopting A Senior Pet

Senior man with senior dogShould you consider adopting a senior pet? The answer is a resounding YES! November is Adopt A Senior Pet Month, so let’s look at some of the reasons why you should at least consider adopting a senior pet.

Senior pets lose their homes for a variety of reasons, and most have nothing to do with their behavior. Their families may have experienced hardship or loss of a home. Sometimes, senior pets have lost their people due to the death of their guardian, or they’ve had to move to a senior care facility or other accommodations that don’t allow pets. Worst of all, some people simply give up their animals because they just don’t want them anymore. No matter how you look at it, it’s heartbreaking.

Reasons to Adopt a Senior Pet

Senior pets need homes just like puppies or kittens. Older animals in shelters or rescues are less likely to be adopted, and more likely to be euthanized.

Senior pets are usually fully house trained and know basic commands. And yes, you can teach an old dog new tricks. Senior pets have a longer attention span than younger animals, and can learn all sorts of new tricks and commands.

Senior pets are less rambunctious than puppies or kittens, so they make wonderful companions for people of all ages, especially senior citizens. They’re calmer, and usually have fewer destructive tendencies than their puppy and kitten counterparts who love to chew everything within their reach while they’re teething.

Finally – you’ll be saving a life. You might be surprised at how much love and joy you’ll get from adopting a senior pet. While they may miss their former family, they can and will bond with new people, and can make wonderful companions for the rest of their days.

How to Recognize Diabetes in Pets

diabetes sign with exclamation pointDiabetes is an endocrine disorder that affects the way the body produces or processes the hormone insulin, which helps the body turn glucose (sugar) from food into energy.

November is National Pet Diabetes Awareness Month, so we thought we’d take some time to review the symptoms of diabetes in dogs and cats.

If your dog is experiencing the following symptoms, make a veterinary appointment as they could be indicators that your dog has diabetes. Please note that these symptoms overlap with many other health conditions, so blood work is required to make a proper diagnosis.

  • Change in appetite
  • Excessive thirst/increase in water consumption
  • Weight loss
  • Increased urination
  • Unusually sweet-smelling or fruity breath
  • Lethargy
  • Dehydration
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Vomiting
  • Cataract formation, blindness
  • Chronic skin infections

Diabetes is the second most common endocrine disease in cats. If your cat is experiencing the following symptoms, make a veterinary appointment as they could be indicators that your cat has diabetes. Please note that these symptoms overlap with many other health conditions, so blood work is required to make a proper diagnosis.

  • Increased thirst (polydipsia) and urination (polyuria)
  • Inappropriate elimination (cats also experience increased urinary tract infections)
  • Change in appetite (increased or decreased appetite is an indicator of a problem)
  • Weight loss
  • Change in gait (walking)
  • Decreased activity, weakness, depression
  • Vomiting

Still not sure? Take the quiz and see if your pet is at risk

Diabetes can be managed. If your pet has symptoms, make an appointment with your veterinarian to make sure your pet can live a longer, healthier life.