Tag Archives: dental for dogs

The Importance of Dental Health

Virtually no one likes going to the dentist…but we all know it’s important! Dental care for humans and animals alike is something that should never be ignored. Proper dental hygiene is a critical part of keeping your pet healthy and happy, helping to avoid potentially life-threatening issues that come with dental disease. Want to know just a bit more? Dr. Tressa MacLennan from our Scottsdale location did a quick segment with a brief overview! Check it out:

National Pet Dental Health Month is Here

2016_AZPV_DentalMonth_RD5-01The American Animal Hospital Association guidelines recommend regular brushing to keep your pet’s teeth healthy. Dental examinations and cleanings should be performed for all adult dogs and cats annually, starting at one year for cats and small-breed dogs, and at two years of age for larger-breed dogs. Here’s why:

Periodontal disease can lead to more serious health problems. Numerous studies show a link between gum disease and serious health issues like heart disease. (This is true for people, too) Prevention is the best approach, so regular brushing, dental exams and cleanings are vital.

Four out of five dogs over the age of three have some sort of periodontal disease. Plaque and tartar build-up on teeth is a sign of trouble, so make dental chewies, teeth brushing and regular check-ups part of your routine. Our feline friends need regular dental care as well.

Brushing means better breath. Bad breath can be an indicator of periodontal disease in people and in pets. Regular brushing helps keep teeth healthier and breath better, so those slobbery kisses won’t take your breath away.

Decay and gum disease can cause tooth loss in animals. This condition which can be very painful, and cause serious health problems. Regular care saves you money in the long run, and helps prevent tooth loss.

Symptoms of Hidden Dental Problems 

Your pets can’t tell you directly that their teeth hurt, so you might not realize they have a serious dental issue until it’s too late. If your pet is drooling more than usual, has bleeding gums, loose teeth, or suspicious looking spots on their gums, make the appointment today.

 

Five warning signs for dog dental health – brush their teeth!

Humans very naturally take care of their teeth. Next to drinking water, brushing our teeth is probably the next most regular thing we do. But who takes care of our dogs’ teeth? And how often? Sadly, for pets, the answer is generally “not often enough”.

canine dental Arrow Group Animal Hospitals
Our group of veterinarian doctors has banded together as the Arrow Group of Animal Hospitals, with a new website at www.Arizonapetvet.com to highlight the dangers in lack of proper dog dental health care for animal owners. Here are some warning signs you should be on the lookout for in checking dogs’ teeth:

Warning signs:

  • Bad breath – one of the first signs of dental disease
  • A yellowish-brown crust of plaque on the teeth near the gum line
  • Red and swollen gums
  • Pain or bleeding when mouth or gums are touched, or when pet is eating
  • Decreased appetite, due to reason above
  • Loose or missing teeth

The opportunity to help desert pet owners has never been greater and these Phoenix pet dentist want to make sure their pets get as much dental care as themselves. Without proper dental care, pets have increased chances of mouth-borne illnesses.

Dental disease is more than just stinky breath! When detected and diagnosed in the early stages, treatment is much more effective at preventing pain, decreases chance of tooth loss and cost is significantly decreased.

Start your pet’s dental care today with www.Arizonapetvet.com.

Dog dental disease is no barking matter!

You love your pets. You buy them the best quality food for their nutritional needs, exercise them for fun and enjoyment, and enjoy the companionship that they provide. You do everything you should as a responsible pet owner. Right? Not always.

Arrow Group of Animal Hospitals, veterinary dental care
One of the most overlooked areas of pet care is veterinary dental care of your dogs and cats. Like ourselves, your animals need professional teeth cleaning on a routine basis. In fact, most veterinarians recommend brushing your animal’s teeth and gums at east twice a week! How many of us are guilty of NOT doing that? Depending on the condition of your pet’s teeth, professional cleaning is recommended every 6 to 18 months.

Lack of brushing your pet’s teeth regularly can lead to other oral health issues, like periodontal disease, a common gum infection found in pets. It’s estimated that 80% of dogs and 70% of cats have some form of periodontal disease.

An animal’s mouth is very similar to ours. Their teeth are subject to the same problems that we can have, such as abscesses, receding gum lines, bone loss, gingivitis, rotten teeth and periodontal disease. When dental health is not addressed, eventually an animal will need things like root canal surgery and extractions. In severe cases, the bacteria and infection in the mouth will spread to the bloodstream, causing problems in the rest of the body, like the liver, kidneys and heart. In the worst cases, these problems will lead to a shorter life span.

Unfortunately, in our fast-paced lifestyle, regular dental brushings and checkups for our pets is a practice that often gets ignored or forgotten. And on top of it, soaring insurance costs coupled with a crippled economy has left many pet owners with minimal funds for their pet’s dental health needs. It’s become so critical that the American Veterinary Medical Association has declared February its National Pet Dental Health Month.

In Arizona, a group of Valley veterinarians have come together under the Arrow Group of Animal Hospitals banner to help bring about awareness to our dogs’ dental care. All the veterinarians in the group are committed to helping pet owners become more aware and learn the responsibility of taking care of their dogs’ dental needs.

“Sadly, most pets we see for regular physicals also show signs of dental negligence and in some cases, gingivitis,” says Dr. Roger Willms of Glendale, AZ’s Arrow Animal Hospital. “In day-to-day living, dog owners simply have a hard time keeping up with brushing their pet’s teeth. But it’s a major cause of concern. You really have to brush your pet’s teeth at least twice a week to make a difference. Otherwise, you’re not really preventing anything. Our pets need good dental care just as the rest of us do.”

Dr. Willms recommends a few tips to pet owners.

1) Bring your pet to the vet! Don’t wait for an annual checkup if you’re detect bad breath or see infected gums on your pet.

2) Start brushing your pet’s teeth at home and supplement their diet with specially formulated pet foods that assist in limiting plaque and tartar buildup. Look for products that have the ‘Seal of Acceptance’ from the Veterinary Oral Health Council, an organization initiated by the American Veterinary Dental Society to guide consumers. These products meet the standards for limiting plaque and tartar control in dogs and cats.

3) Be regular with your veterinary checkups for your pets. You would do the same for your childrens’ doctor visits, so do the same with your pets. Your veterinarian can monitor the progress of your pet’s dental health routine, and make individual recommendations.

Arrow Group of Animal Hospitals and its 16 affiliated animal hospitals in the Phoenix area are dedicated to the highest care of dogs, cats, and small animals. The doctors are highly-trained in the care of animals, and have undergone extensive training for the dental care of dogs and cats. If you’ve not made a veterinary dental visit recently, contact ArizonaPetVet.com and see one of the doctors from the Arrow Group of Animal Hospitals for all your pet needs.