Tag Archives: veterinary services Cave Creek

National Vet Tech Week is Here

Vet Tech Week 2018Veterinary technicians are some of the most important people in the AZPetVet family. A licensed veterinary technician, or LVT, has earned an associate’s degree or higher in veterinary technology from an accredited school. Most importantly, a licensed Vet Tech has passed a national exam demonstrating specific knowledge and competencies. A Vet Tech’s training includes laboratory and clinical work with live animals. You’ll find Vet Techs wherever you find veterinarians on staff – from animal hospitals like AZPetVet to the zoo. 

What Does a Vet Tech Do?

Vet Techs perform a variety of functions every single day. Here are just a few:

  • Educate about pet health
  • Initial evaluation of an animal’s condition
  • Collect blood and stool samples
  • Check vital statistics
  • Clean and wrap wounds
  • Provide nutritional advice
  • Assist in surgery
  • Administer medications
  • Perform rehabilitative therapies
  • Provide nursing care
  • Take X-rays of patients
  • Provide scritchies and cuddles

The Veterinary Technician’s Oath

“I solemnly dedicate myself to aiding animals and society by providing excellent care and services for animals, by alleviating animal suffering, and promoting public health.

I accept my obligations to practice my profession conscientiously and with sensitivity, adhering to the profession’s Code of Ethics, and furthering my knowledge and competence through a commitment to lifelong learning.”

AZPetVet salutes all of the hard-working Vet Techs who make a difference in animals’ lives each day! Looking for a job as a Vet Tech? We’re always hiring great team members! Send your resume to HireMe@AZPetVet.com for consideration.

Is My Pet Too Fat?

black and white cartoon of a fat catIf you’re asking the question ‘Is my pet too fat,’ the answer is probably YES. 

In the U.S., it’s estimated that 57 percent of cats and 52 percent of dogs are overweight or clinically obese.

October 10th is Pet Obesity Awareness Day, so it’s a great time for people who think their pet may be too fat to learn about the common causes of obesity in pets. Good information means you can act before excess weight negatively impacts your pet’s health, along with your heart and your wallet. Nobody needs extra vet bills.

How Pets Get FAT

Overfeeding is one of the main culprits in pet obesity – but it’s not just treat-based. Many people simply fill their pet’s bowl with food without thinking about the calories. Always use a measuring cup and follow the manufacturer’s guidelines for weight, age and activity levels.

black and white cartoon dog begging for a treatKeep treats to a minimum. It’s easy to slip treats to a pet that wants your attention while you’re busy with something else.

Next it’s because they look so cute, sweet, sad.

If your pet learns you’ll reward them for a particular behavior, they’ll work it for everything they can get.

Lack of exercise is another issue – make sure your dog gets walks regularly (it’s good for you both) and that both cats and dogs get plenty of play time and activities to keep them moving. Even cats can be trained to walk on a leash – why not give it a try?

Remember, obesity in pets is not always due too many treats and too little exercise. Just as in humans, underlying health issues like diabetes, thyroid or adrenal disorders can also cause weight gain in animals. If your pet is gaining weight, or already overweight or obese, it’s time to schedule a visit to the vet. 

Check out your pet’s weight equivalent by breed, age and gender here to see if they are at a healthy weight or need to lose weight: http://www.petobesityprevention.org/pet-weight-translator/

You Might Have Missed These Helpful Posts

We cover lots of topics in our blog, and this summer was especially busy! Here are some of the latest posts you might have missed with some of our AZPetVet doctors:

Dogs & Sun Burn

Pet Safety at the Dog Park

Barbecues & Pets – What to Watch Out For

Desert Dangers – Keep Your Pets Safe

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Goodbye Summer – Hello, Fall!

It’s been a long, hot summer. That’s nothing unusual for Arizona, of course! We’ve shared a lot of tips over the past few months about keeping pets safe and healthy during the summer months. At the close of September, we’d like to take some time to look back at some of the pet safety tips you may have missed.

The Signs of Heatstroke in Pets

Summer Safety Tips for Pets

Dr. Amy Schomburg on Your Life Arizona

Monsoon Menace: Sonoran Toads & What Pet Owners Need to Know

4 Keys Ways to Boat Safely With Pets

Valley Fever in Dogs: Risks, Symptoms & Treatment

Pets & Pool Safety With Dr. John Graham

Why Pets Need Vaccinations

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Summer Pet Safety Tips – Toxic Barbecue Foods

Barbecues are a big deal in Arizona – not just in the summertime, but all year round! It’s important that everyone have a great time and stay safe; including your pets!

Do you know what common backyard barbecue foods are especially dangerous for your furry friends? AZPetVet’s Dr. Elizabeth Glicksman shares some valuable insights about pets and barbecues with the Your Life Arizona viewers. Check it out!

Potential Food Hazards For Pets

Corn on the Cob – while it seems like a natural treat, it poses a choking hazard.

Hot Dogs – another hazard for dogs! They are OK in very small amounts, but remember the preservatives and salt are not good for Fido’s tummy.

Potato Chips & Pretzels – these crunchy human treats have far too much sodium which can cause excessive thirst and urination in both people and pets. For pets, the worse case scenario: vomiting, diarrhea, depression, tremors, fever, seizures, or death.

Ribs, Steak or Chicken Bones – yes, we all love barbecued ribs and other savory treats, but resist the urge to throw your dog a bone. All bones – especially when cooked – pose a danger to pets so any sort of bone treat requires strict supervision. From choking hazards, to splintering and causing a puncture to the digestive tract, there are too many dangers to pets. Bones can also break teeth – so always keep a close eye on your dog when chewing bones of any sort.

Fatty Foods – these are very hard on a dog’s intestines and can cause all sorts of tummy upsets, diarrhea and other icky things you do not want to have to contend with – the biggest danger of all is inflammation of the pancreas or pancreatitis – so skip the fatty stuff!

Guacamole – Avocado contains a toxic compound called persin that is very dangerous to birds, rabbits and horses, much less so for dogs, but enough to put it on our banned food list. It’ll cause tummy upset. Guacamole also contains garlic and onions which are toxic for dogs.

Grapes – while many fruits and veggies are fine for pets, grapes and raisins have been connected to dogs developing kidney failure. While some dogs can eat them and be fine, others might eat just a few and develop a life threatening toxic condition.

According to the ASPCA, dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicosis usually show symptoms like vomiting, lethargy or diarrhea within 12 hours of ingestion. Untreated, dogs will become increasingly lethargic and dehydrated and refuse to eat. They may also increase urination for a period, followed by decreased or no urination in later stages. Death due to kidney failure may occur within three to four days. Dogs who survive acute raisin or grape toxicosis are likely to suffer long-term kidney disease.

Chocolate Desserts – chocolate can be fatally toxic to dogs, especially when it’s the sugar-free variety. Both chocolate and Xylitol have potentially fatal compounds. Chocolate poisoning can lead to heart arrhythmias, muscle tremors, and seizures. Xylitol can lead to blood sugar levels dropping rapidly within a half hour of ingestion, which can lead to disorientation, seizures or liver failure which can be fatal.

Alcoholic Drinks – just a few ounces of beer or wine can be poisonous to a dog or cat, so be sure to clear away drinks that pets (or children) could get into.

If you think your pet has eaten something they shouldn’t – give your vet a call. If it’s after hours, call an Emergency Vet location or the Pet Poison Hotline, which is open 24/7: 855.764.7661